Moroccan Spiced Carrots

Here is a beautiful alternative to the good old carrot, apple, lemon juice and raisin salad, ok ok, beetroot is cool too 🙂

You might have been lucky to see me sampling this salad at Remuera New World this afternoon. If not, here is the recipe. Needless to say that organic is best! New season’s organic carrots are on the shelves now. Go get’em!

Moroccan Spiced CarrotsCarrots with Moroccan Spices

Serves 4

  • 4 carrots, very thinly sliced or grated
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley
  •  ¼ cup chopped walnuts
  •  ¼ cup sultanas
  •  2 Tbsp lemon juice
  •  1 Tbsp olive oil
  •  ¼ cup fresh orange juice
  •  dash ground cumin
  •  dash cayenne pepper
  •  dash cinnamon
  •  ¼ tsp natural sea salt or to taste
  •  fresh ground pepper to taste
  1. Combine the carrots with the lemon and orange juice, olive oil, and sea salt
  2. Massage or toss well.
  3. Add the other ingredients and toss well to combine.

Note: Alternatively to using the individual spices Cayenne pepper, cinnamon, cumin and black pepper I like to use 1/2 tsp of a brilliant North African ‘Ras El Hanout’ spice blend by chef Greg Malouf. His blend contains also cardamom seeds, turmeric, coriander and many others. It just gives this salad an even more exotic and rounded flavour. You can buy this specific spice blend form New World Remuera. The salad is available there too – at the deli counter. Yes I will restock tomorrow – beside doing a Sauerkraut food demo! See you in the afternoon!

'Mandolined' carrots

A good workout on the mandolin

Have fun playing and watch your fingers!

René

🙂

Orgasmic Blueberry Pie – a raw revelation

And here is another all-time favourite of mine. A raw pie that works with all kind of fruit. Any frozen berry will do, although I prefer organic strawberries or blueberries because of their small seeds. Ripe pears with ginger work well, persimmons are great, so is kiwifruit. Just make sure you add enough lime or lemon juice to counter balance the fruit sugar and the sweetness of the crust.

The proper ratio for the psyllium husk powder is 1 Tbsp per 2 cups of mixture. Add last and blend well. Then quickly pour the filling. It will solidify in less than 5min. After about 30min the pie will hold up nicely when you lift it out of the pie form. If you can’t get psyllium husk powder just buy normal psyllium husks and grind them into a fine powder in your blender. It will jelly into a more homogenous texture than the whole psyllium husks.

Once you get the hang of this pie 15 min preparation time + 30 min resting time in the refrigerator should be the norm. The best thing about raw pies and cakes: they never burn! 🙂

Orgasmic Blueberry PieOrgasmic Blueberry Pie

Serves 8

Crust¨

  • 200g shredded coconut
  • 200g raw cashews
  • 2 Tbsp light honey or raw agave nectar
  • ¼ tsp lemon juice

Filling

  • 750g frozen organic blueberries, defrosted
  • 6 organic Medjool dates, pitted
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ tsp lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp Psyllium husk powder (1Tbsp per 2 cups of liquid)
  • ½ mango or pineapple, finely diced for garnish
  1. To make the crust, in a food processor grind the coconut into a fine powder. Add the cashews and continue processing till they are broken down finely. Add the honey/agave nectar and lemon juice and process till the mixture sticks together.
  2. Press into a pie form with removable bottom.
  3. To make filling blend the defrosted blueberries with the dates, vanilla extract and lime juice to a smooth liquid consistency. Add the Psyllium husk powder and blend shortly to distribute evenly throughout the mixture.
  4. Pour filling onto crust. Tap pie form a few times to let air bubbles escape and to distribute filling evenly. Smooth surface with a little spatula.
  5. Refrigerate before serving and garnish with mango or pineapple.

Enjoy!

René

🙂

Surprising alternative to cole slaw – Cabbage Cranberry Salad

Here is a delicious winter recipe with a surprisingly easy preparation and brilliant flavour combination. The cranberries add a lovely sweet and bitter contrast to the salad.

You might have seen me demonstrating and sampling this salad at New World in Remuera, Auckland. Stay tuned, there is more good stuff to come!

Cabbage SaladCabbage Cranberry Salad
Serves 6

¨        1 head of green cabbage, finely chopped, center removed

¨        ½ tsp natural sea salt (to taste)

¨        2 Tbsp grape seed oil

¨        1 avocado, seeded and peeled – optional for a creamier dressing

¨        ½ lemon, juiced or 1Tbsp organic apple cider vinegar

¨        ½ cup dried cranberries

  1. Combine all ingredients in a big mixing bowl and massage well by using your hands in order to soften the cabbage.
  2. Pause and let the salad rest for 5 min before massaging it to final softness. The cabbage should start to release liquid. Together with the finely distributed avocado this will make your dressing and also soften the dried cranberries.

Variations: Play with other vegetables from the cabbage family! Broccoli and kale work well. You can also add carrots and beetroot.

Substitute the cranberries with sultanas or dried and minced apricot. To soften cabbage and other hardy vegetables by massaging you will need natural salt. Acid and oil will help to soften the vegetables too and to distribute the flavours.

Happy massaging!

René

🙂

Raw Sauerkraut – my German heritage at its very best!

This recipe has become a staple in our kitchen and pantry. Once made the sauerkraut will last for months. That’s what it originally was made for – to preserve the cabbage harvest over the winter months. With a little bit of help from the Lactobacillus acidophilus that lives naturally on cabbage. It turns the fermenting cabbage into a pro-biotic feast. Your intestines will love you for the support of friendly bacteria. In fact sauerkraut and other fermented cabbage products (more posts to come) have been a major part of our own rejuvenative diet. Ask your naturopath or colon therapist for their opinion on friendly bacteria from sauerkraut!

Raw SauerkrautHere we go with the culinary fun:

Sauerkraut

makes about 3cups to 1liter

¨        1 head cabbage, shredded finely

¨        2 t natural sea salt

¨        ¼ cup minced fresh dill or 1 T dried

¨        1 apple, peeled, cored and diced

  1. Massage the cabbage with the salt until the liquid starts to release.
  2. Let the cabbage rest for 10 minutes and massage it again. Repeat as often as necessary until the cabbage is very juicy. Add the remaining ingredients.
  3. Pack the mixture firmly into a large glass jar, crock, or bowl. Press the cabbage down until the liquid rises above it approximately 0.5cm.
  4. If you are using a large jar for your kraut, place a weight on top of the cabbage, such as a jar filled with water or a plastic bag filled with filtered water (see picture). Make sure to cover the jar with another plastic bag to keep any critters out. Place the jar in a bowl to catch any overflow of sauerkraut juice. collect the juice in a jar in your fridge and back to the finished kraut.Sauerkraut covered with bag
  5. Allow the kraut to ferment in your kitchen for at least 3 days (see note). We line the jars up in the window (no direct sun though).
  6. Once the kraut is ready, store it in airtight glass jars in the refrigerator. It will keep for several months.

Note: Kraut may be fermented for up to14 days, depending upon the desired degree of sourness.

Have fun experimenting with Sauerkraut! You can make variations with red cabbage, kale, add grated carrots, parsnips, broccoli etc.. It still is a great way to preserve a temporary over supply of vegetables.

Sauerkraut jarIf you plan on adding any spicy foods like garlic or chilies to your sauerkraut wait till it is properly fermented. Garlic, chilies, ginger etc. are nature’s anti-biotics and will actually delay the fermentation process by inhibiting the lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria – for a while at least.

Other flavour options apart from dill are juniper berries and caraway (a spice I still hold some traumatic childhood memories of :-)).

Use your clean hands to massage the kraut! Go full out! Deep tissue, not Bowen 😉 The natural bacteria on your hands will be good for the fermentation process too. Just avoid those nasty alcohol-based desinfectants. ‘Dr. Bronners’ soaps will do – for a mild peppermint flavour in your Sauerkraut – just kidding.

The jar you see in the picture is a former olive or capers jar from our local deli. They hold 2 liters of anything (obviously :-)) and make great storage vessels for your pantry. We keep all of our nuts, seeds, spices, flour, crackers etc. in them.

Happy fermenting!

RenéSauerkraut fermenting on our window sill

Raw Snack Recipe – Chocolate Walnuts

With our “Dry it, you will like it!” class coming up here a little teaser and one of my favourite raw snack recipes. Should you prefer pecans over walnuts use them! For a different twist try sunflower seeds. They have a lighter yet nutty base flavour and dry in handy clusters. See the yummy picture below!

Raw snack - chocolate walnutsChocolate Walnuts

Makes 1+ dehydrator tray

  • 3 c soaked walnut halves
  • 4 T date paste
  • 2 T agave nectar
  • 6 T organic whole fat cocoa powder, raw if you choose
  • ½ t cinnamon
  • 1 t vanilla essence
  • 3 drops butterscotch flavour or maple essence
  • pinch natural sea salt
  • ¼ t lime juice (I always add a few drops of citrus juice to chocolate – as it balances the flavours nicely)
Method
  1. Mix everything thoroughly in a big bowl.
  2. Spread on Teflex sheet.
  3. Dehydrate at 105F for 12 hours. Turn over and remove Teflex sheet. Dehydrate for another 12 hours or until crisp. Turn trays by 90° periodically.
  4. Store in sealed glass jars (what’s leftover from snacking during dehydrating :-))

Enjoy!

Raw Chocolate Sunnies

René